April 15-16, 2016
UNC Chapel Hill

About BAS

The SPEIA Basketball Analytics Summit is held on the beautiful campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Our mission is to engage with and explore the best practices of the leading basketball experts (professionals, students, and scholars) who love, research, and work in the discipline of performance (individual or team) and business analytics. Past sessions included: Fan Experience & Engagement, Individual Performance/APBRmetrics, Marketing/Ticketing, Sport Science, and Entrepreneurship in Analytics. In addition, undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to participate in the NBA Analytics Case Competition.

The summit is part of the Sports Entrepreneurship initiative at the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise.


Group of 5 or More High School Students *

$25

* Accompanied by parent and/or coach. First parent/coach is free.

All Individual
College Students

$50

UNC System
Faculty

$100

General
Admission

$250

2016 Agenda

** The Summit dress for all sessions is Business Casual.

DOWNLOAD THE FULL AGENDA! TWEENER & KEYNOTE OVERVIEW

Friday - April 15

12:00-1:45pm
Case Competition Presentations
Top Six Teams
1:00-6:00pm
Registration
The Parrish Group, LLC. presents "The Tweeners":
2:00-2:45pm
Breakout Session 1A
SAP Sports
Breakout Session 1B
WHOOP
Breakout Session 1C
ACC - Brand Marketing
Breakout Session 1D
Basketball Analytics 101
with Dean Oliver
2:45-3:00pm
Break
3:00-3:45pm
Breakout Session 2A
Fusionetics
Breakout Session 2B
Wasserman
Breakout Session 2C
Fanvana
3:45-4:00pm
Break
4:00-4:45pm
Breakout Session 3A
Lean Basketball Analytics
Breakout Session 3B
NBA Math Hoops
Breakout Session 3C
VERT
4:45-5:00pm
Break
5:00 - 5:45pm
Breakout Session 4A
Google
Breakout Session 4B
Careers & Entrepreneurship in Analytics
Breakout Session 4C
Situational Analysis: Basketball & Football Analytics
(NFL Chicago Bears)
6:00
Reception
6:45 - 7:30pm
Noel Nash Keynote
The World of ESPN Statistics & Information
7:30 - 8:30pm
"Chatter in the Paint" with Pro Basketball Experts

Saturday - April 16

8:30-9:15am
Dr. Patrick Lucey, Director of Data Science at STATS Keynote
9:30 - 10:30am
Panel
Fan Experience & Engagement

In an era where fans have an unlimited range of entertainment options at their fingertips, athletic departments and executives must strive to keep fans engaged and interested in their game. However, a balance must be found between keeping basketball purists happy and casual fans entertained at arenas.

We will analyze the most effective ways to bring people into the arena, while maintaining and enhancing fan engagement. The ultimate goal is to create a strong home court advantage while simultaneously providing a world-class entertainment experience.

10:30 - 10:45am
Break
10:45 - 11:45am
Panel
Sport Science

As technology empowers teams to maximize efficiency and minimize injuries, early adopters gain a competitive advantage that can provide the edge necessary to win games and championships. Sport Medicine, Exercise Physiology, and Performance Training innovations are enabling players to reach their full potential quicker. For example, wearable sensors provide real-time feedback to coaches, trainers, and players.

This panel will explore these new technologies and the impact of biological and performance data on injury, rehabilitation, safety, and training of basketball players.

11:45 - 12:30pm
Lunch
12:30 - 1:15pm
Ken Pomeroy Keynote
Inside the Mind of Ken Pomeroy
1:20 - 2:20pm
Panel
Individual Performance

Basketball statistics began as simple averages that seemingly told the full story of an athlete's performance. As statistics research has progressed, we have been able to more deeply analyze a player's impact on the court. Today, general managers and coaches are paying more attention than ever to advanced metrics like True Shooting Percentage and Win Shares.

Panelists will discuss the significance of advanced metrics and the role they play in the college and professional game. By weighing the value of different metrics, we'll consider which of the data available today is the most important in assessing a player's performance and value to a team.

2:20 - 2:30pm
Break
2:30 - 3:30pm
Panel
Marketing & Ticketing

Ticketing (and the marketing that propels ticket sales) is one of the key drivers of revenue generation for the sport industry. Businesses, municipalities, universities, and professional sport teams have recognized the opportunity that exists to increase revenue as traditional ticketing methods are redefined through the use of technology and analytics.

Panelists will discuss this critical and evolving component of the sport industry as we uncover solutions to typical ticketing and marketing strategies.

4:15 - 4:45pm
Closing Remarks
5:00pm -
Networking Reception
at Hickory Tavern

Speakers' Stories

Swipe left/right for more speakers

Ken Pomeroy – www.kenpom.com

What are your current primary responsibilities?

For the most part I work independently, with a lot of it being free-form. My primary responsibilities range from interpreting sports data for coaches and front office staff, to doing statistical consulting for various teams, to running my website, www.kenpom.com.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

The most important aspect of analytics today revolves around being able to manage large data sets in a timely and digestible fashion. This is a huge challenge right now, especially because of the recent emergence of the SportVu application that collects and populates an abundance of data. Understanding how to slice and dice these massive data files in an efficient and effective manner will be important for growing analytics within the sports industry.

Who do you admire? Why?

Keeping my response in the theme of analytics, I admire Jeff Sagarin – a pioneer in the field of sport analytics. Sagarin conducted his statistical analysis in a time when it was extremely difficult to acquire the data and code up algorithms. His ground breaking findings and research studies paved the way for those who work with analytics and statistics within the sports industry.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

My favorite teams' center around the two places I went to school – Virginia Tech and Wyoming.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Learn as many different skills as possible, this will help differentiate you from that of your peers. As it relates to getting into basketball analytics, it is critical to be able to code and access, find, and manipulate data. Doing this well will both help you unlock key insights and information for which you can build upon, and will also serve as insights to inform others in the industry on their decision making processes.

Robbie Allen – Automated Insights

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am the CEO and founder of Automated Insights – an artificial intelligence company that transforms big data into written reports through the robust analysis, personality, and variability of a human writer. As the founder, I am responsible for the strategy, culture, and over well-being of the company.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

The fastest growing and most importance aspect going forward is the analysis of the individual players, which will be built off the data supplied and captured through the SportVu application. We are just scratching the surface as to what can be done and will be done within this space. The challenge for which we, as those within the sports analytics field, will need to overcome is that there is so much data now available that we have to be smart with how we use and interpret that data.

Who do you admire? Why?

Currently, the person I admire most is Elon Musk. He is someone who constantly looks to take on more work, doing it all while exceeding expectations.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

I am a huge UNC Tarheel fan. This is evidenced by Inside Carolina – a magazine and web site devoted to covering UNC athletics – profiling me as "fan of the month" back in 2007.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Look to pursue roles that stray away from the standard jobs in the sports industry. Now, more than ever, with the advancements in technology you have the tools and resources to think outside the box. By coming up with new ways to advance those positions, you will be better suited to land a position in the sports industry. Continue to be a forward thinker because this space, the sports analytics industry, is evolving rapidly.

automatedinsights.com/team/

Dr. Mike Clark – Fusionetics

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am the founder, principal owner, and CEO of Fusionetics and responsible for delivering: world-class, evidence-based, technology-enabled, solutions-focused products that will help reduce injuries, improve performance, and enhance recovery.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

We are too focused on data capture…..analytics without a plan is wasteful. We need to be just as enamored with data visualization and data utilization and results as technology and analytics.

Who do you admire? Why?

I highly respect the following: Brian Colangelo – Visionary • RC Buford – Visionary, Pragmatic, Game Changer • Sean Marks – 12 Year NBA Vet, Future Game Changer • Aaron Nelson – Top ATC in all of Sports Medicine • Dr. Tom Carter – New age ortho • Grant Hill – CLASS Athlete • Kobe Bryant – Driven/Committed • BJ Armstrong – Agent with a purpose and vision • Obviously too many more too mention/...

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

In basketball – Grant Hill or Kobe Bryant for the following reasons: smart, hard-working, high "get it" factor, great team leader, awesome human beings, and did I mention hard-working!

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Know what you want • Know why you want "it" • Create a clear game plan to make "it" happen • Be willing to make the necessary sacrifices to get to what you want (know it, love it, own it, do IT!) • The only place that success comes before work is IN the dictionary!

Trevor Corbin – NBA Charlotte Hornets

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am the Senior Manager of business intelligence for the Charlotte Hornets. I am responsible for ticket pricing, inventory management, forecasting game attendance and revenue, and providing analytical insights to help the sponsorship team and sales team. I also focus on improving the effectiveness of marketing and campaigning in hopes to increase season ticket holder retention. Lastly, with the information I gather, I provide feedback on merchandise sales, food and beverage sales, and revenues from other arena events.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

From a business perspective, the most important aspect of analytics is the concept of customer lifetime value. With CRM software and warehouse analyzing we can learn so much information about our customers. The next step is determining what actions you can take to increase spending and keep customers coming back, and that is what I mostly work on.

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire my brother and father – they showed me by example how to be a great leader and an impartial decision maker and effective communicator. That is the kind of person who is in charge and who is willing to give analytics a chance in basketball. I thank them for allowing me to do what I do today.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

I am obviously a huge hornets fan, but apart from that I am actually a Duke college basketball fan because my brother graduated from there. I also really enjoy watching Steph Curry play, mostly because he is such an anomaly when it comes to statistics and modeling.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

It is important to have a strong background in math or even computer science as the world becomes more and more tech-based. The best thing to do is to go out and get experience with an internship in sports. Figure out if that is something you could see yourself doing long-term. The connections you make during the internships are invaluable.

Michel Eady - Knight Eady Sports Group

What are your current primary responsibilities?

My responsibility at the company consists of mostly sales and marketing. I work on selling sponsorships and driving the ship on our marketing efforts. I deal with our specific clients and also handle all the marketing elements of the events that we host including signage, social media, external marketing events, and handling sponsorship activity.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

I think the social media aspect is very fascinating. We all assume that young people are the only people who are engaged in social media, however we can’t ignore that it is such an ever-changing world. It is changing so much and so fast, and learning how to engage with users in that arena is essential. It is almost impossible to keep up with it at times. Once you pick up on a trend, there is a new feature or new platform added that has altered the game.

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire a lot of people, but I have a lot of admiration for high school basketball coaches in general. Basically, high school basketball is where I fell in love with sports. My high school basketball coach had a tremendous amount of influence on me in regard to developing my character, which altered my thinking of sports. We believe in the power of sports and how it can transform lives and change people for the better. In my current role, we do a lot of sporting events in the amateur arena which allows us to be a part of the most memorable experiences of their lives.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

I am a big Cubs fan which is random since I am from Birmingham, AL. As a kid, I would get home and catch the last few innings of the game on WGN, which made me a big fan growing up. I try to go to at least one game a year in Chicago. The passion that the Cubs fans have is very rare. When you can have fans that are passionate, especially when they haven’t tasted victories, it really speaks to the organization. I do follow Alabama athletics as well since I graduated from there. While I do love Alabama, we also do work with other college football teams too. We understand the impact of sports, no matter the university loyalties.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Your academics are extremely important and you should apply yourself in the classroom. However, more important is getting yourself into something with hands-on experience in sports. You need to work in an environment that is in sports and figure out why you want to work in sports. You need to be able to articulate why you love sports and why you want to work in sports. Until you can articulate that and distinguish yourself from others, it will be very hard to get into sports. Also, get some experience in a large major organization and get your hands dirty in a smaller, start-up company as well. The more variety and more experience you have, the more you can distinguish yourself from everyone else.

Gabe Farkas - San Antonio Spurs

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I head up the analytics group for the NBA's San Antonio Spurs. As part of that role, I oversee game preparation, provide front-office support (helping out with free agency, the upcoming draft, and trade evaluations), work with the performance and training staff/faculty, and maintain the team's information systems.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Outside of SportVu, I believe the fastest growing aspect of analytics is in the analysis of individual athlete performance, recovery, and training. Knowing detailed measures such as player exertion and the physical load that a player can handle, will help teams be more proactive to effectively managing injuries.

Who do you admire? Why?

This question has really got me thinking, here are a few of the people that I admire:

  • Pete Carril – former Princeton basketball coach, inventor of the "Princeton Offense". He had his own way of expressing himself that was both highly intelligent and also somewhat crass at the same time, but always insightful. He stuck to his own belief on how things should be done, even in the face of criticism.
  • W. Edwards Deming – famous statistician, basically the father of the idea of "quality control". He worked in Japan after WW2, and is widely credited with having a big influence in their post-war economic growth and rise to prominence. He coined the phrase "you can't change what you don't measure."
  • Vilfredo Pareto – Italian economist, who was basically the first person to apply data and research to the study of economics. Before him, it had been much more of a study of moralism and philosophy, while he made it into a data-driven field that demanded scientific rigor.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

Outside of being a huge San Antonio Spurs fan, other teams for which I follow are the Buffalo Bills and the New York Mets. From a business standpoint, I follow the St. Louis Cardinals and Oakland Athletics as I believe they are well organized franchises that are worthy to follow as it relates to how they conduct business.

A favorite player of mine is Novak Djokovic. He has a great all-around game, but even more importantly, he studies his opponent's weaknesses and is willing to adapt his game accordingly.

* Carlos Beltran was one of my favorite players when he was a Met. He has now jumped to the other side of New York playing for the Yankees; therefore, he is no longer a favorite player of mine.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Figure out what you want to do and where you want to end up. It is important that you educate yourself within that field so that you have the right background to position yourself for those roles. Additionally, don't just say that you want to work in sports, show that you want to by getting meaningful hands-on experience – put yourself out there by showing, through your work, that you are passionate about a particular field within the sports industry.

Khalil Fuller – NBA Math Hoops

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am the CEO of Learn Fresh. We've partnered with the NBA to make a fun math enrichment tool for elementary and middle school students that is centered around basketball. As the CEO of a rapidly growing startup, my responsibilities are fairly all-inclusive, but the three core areas where I focus my time and effort are partnership and resource development, human development, and strategy.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

I'm really excited by the fact that more and more people and companies are starting to take a serious look at the deep statistics of basketball, and they are finally starting to allow us to make sense of all of the data and actually use it to make decisions. When analytics exploded for the sport of basketball, for a while I feel like most people were drowning in different data points and unable to sort them well, and that's starting to change.

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire Muhammad Ali because he wasn't afraid of his greatness, and because he used his incredible prominence on the world stage to speak up for civil rights issues and actually make a difference.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

I grew up in Los Angeles, so I'm a die-hard Lakers fan, so this question hurts right now! We'll bounce back.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

I think it's not enough to be "interested in a career in the sports industry" anymore, I think in order to really break in you have to have a very targeted interest. A lot of people love sports and feel like working in some capacity for a team or league would be a dream come true, but I'd ask those people to more deeply interrogate what it is they actually like to do on a day to day basis and try to find a position of that nature inside sports, if possible.

There are more and more companies and start-ups that are working with sports leagues and teams as their partners, and often these companies are easier to get access to than the giant league itself, so that's a good place to start.

Pete Giorgio - Monitor Deloitte

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I run our Sports Consulting practice for the United States. This work ranges from Strategy to Technology to HR and Human Capital work. It not only includes the sales arm, but I am also helping on the delivery of the work we recommend.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

The precision and depth of the data that we can collect is going to be exponential. Everything from wearables to video – and their ability track very specific things – to what is happening on the court is going to change the sports world. Organizations today do not have the capability to analyze the data they currently have, let alone this new explosion that is going to happen. Businesses are just on the cusp to trust and employ analytics with their organizations. Currently, sports organizations are in a weird middle point. They know analytics can be important, but they also know their systems don’t talk to each other so they don’t know how to use it properly. Right now, most organizations do not have a centralized data system to operate from. Analytics in sports is going mirror what happened to the retail industry 10 years ago. The retail industry never used analytics, and now they can’t live without them. Specifically for basketball, one of the places where we haven’t cracked the nut yet on how to use analytics is on the sponsorship side. If you think about the big revenue drivers: tickets, rights, merchandise and concessions – you see analytics being used. However, there is not as much use on the sponsorship side. That will be an interesting place for the future, and we can see some movement there. It will be cool the day that you can auction off sponsorships in real time for sporting events. Arenas have the same real estate as Google and can run the same types of auctions that Google has for their Ad Words, so why not?

Who do you admire and why?

My grandmother. She was a single mother in the 40s who started her own business. She started a school and grew it exponentially. She took it from nothing to being one of the biggest nursery schools in her town while raising four kids.

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

I am a huge Patriots fan. Partly, because I live there, but also I admire the fact that they are in an industry where there is always a 5-10 year cycle of being successful. However, they have figured out a way to do it consistently and do it not just because they are smart, but because they have created a culture of winning. For an athlete, I have always been a big fan of Kevin McHale. He did not have the athletic prowess compared to Michael Jordan, but he was able to make it in the NBA. He also played the post position like me!

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

Be relentless, don’t do it for the money, and have fun because these are games at the end of the day.

Thayer Lavielle - Wasserman Media Group

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I help focus on business development and growth of the company across all verticals. I also seek out strategic growth plans by finding where possible opportunities exist and working with the experts to analyze the industry.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

I definitely have noticed a transition to more digitization and customization specific to each individual. Recently there has been a clear convergence of sports and entertainment and it is critical for leagues, teams, and individuals to figure out how to differentiate themselves. Also the industry has become much more fragmented and in turn much more customized.

Who do you admire and why?

I admire a lot of people, but the first one that comes to mind is Vicky Chun, the Athletic Director of Colgate, my alma mater. She was one year ahead of me and worked her way up from the bottom. I also admire my current boss Elizabeth Lindsey because I have learned so much from her, and also my previous boss at L’Oreal, Jack Wiswall.

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

I am from Boston so I am all about anything from Boston: Celtics, Red Sox, Patriots, and of course I’m a big Tom Brady fan.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

Definitely get your hands dirty – a lot of this young generation has this sense of entitlement that is perplexing to my generation and it is quite off-putting for hiring. You need to be willing to start at the bottom and work your way up.

Elizabeth Lindsey - Wasserman

What are your current primary responsibilities?

Run global marketing practice for Wasserman team all of brand property clients around global work a range of projects from consulting, activation, negotiation, and branding globally

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Focus working less with athlete analytics, but more with brand and sponsorships analytics driven by the team and athletes; Focus effective leveraging for sponsorships with the athletes /teams

  • Work a lot with NBA /NCAA spoke about these organizations being very progressive; distribution of their analytics and gotten content to fans and work their sponsors in different ways / Delivered value / progressive opportunities they can provide
  • Helping sponsors and fans understand tangible data and using it to progress

Who do you admire and why?

Within industry –not just one person but those who operate with integrity; inspiration by athletes, brands, teams, and coaches who have respect for each other and the industry; understand their role in sport inspiration relative to the fans and the brand

Within the industry there is a tendency to showcase the negatives, so she has great appreciation for those with integrity

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

She always tells people “I’m not sports fan” – love the work she is in and perhaps better at it because she is not a huge fan the sports, players, and teams themselves. Great respect for the industry, but no preference. She loves the experience of sports, not a passion for one over the other; although she is not a fan – she looks for those who are and have passion for teams which is relative to her job with marketing and branding

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

  • WORK HARD – pay attention to everything
  • Read
  • Build relationships!
  • Respect the industry
  • Don’t expect it to come easy- WORK HARD
  • Pay your dues / be willing to do what you need
  • Make as many relationships as you can
  • Be engaged / take initiative

Bryan Littlejohn - Select Physical Therapy

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I serve as the manager for an orthopedic practice for Select Physical Therapy, off of Franklin St in Chapel Hill. I deal with patients, do some of the management side, and teach a course at NC Central University

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Recently, one of the fastest growing aspects of analytics I’m seeing is player efficiency ratings with Steph Curry and other prominent basketball players in NBA and WNBA and collegiate teams. From a coaching perspective [analytics helps with] team tendencies and can be helpful when recruiting. Odds and probability—if a player is right-handed, what are the odds that they’ll dribble to get to their right hand? Using analytics to help determine these things is key.

Who do you admire and why?

Isaiah Thomas. The way he plays the game--he has tremendous passion. I admire his style of play and the way he galvanized his team.

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

I follow Stephen Curry and have always been a fan of LeBron James. For teams, I follow the Cleveland Cavaliers.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

Follow your dreams and don’t accept no as an answer. Continue to have your goals set firm—write your goals down and look at them every day. Focus on your goals and then take the steps to get there.

Michal Lorenc - Google

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am responsible for a team at Google that works with live events clients including all sports leagues, teams in the league, largest athletic departments at universities, largest touring and promotional companies, ticketing clients both primary and secondary, and family entertainment Broadway.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

For me, the fastest growing trend is not only to gather the data, but to understand and act upon all of the data that teams gather in both online and offline environments. It is how teams and organizations can combine CRM, ticket holder data, surveys, analytics data, and first and third-party data in order to run smarter marketing campaigns.

Who do you admire and why?

My boss, Larry Page, the Cofounder of Google. Specifically because he has this very strong understanding of the need for technology and innovation. He truly believes technology can make our lives much better, but he also understands that you need to build a solid profitable business to reach those lofty goals. It is not just pie in the sky, but he knows you must have a solid plan and resources in order to attack those challenges ahead of you. So it is either, Larry, or my kids!

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

I came to the US when I was 18, and I initially lived in Chicago. Therefore, I am a huge Chicago Cubs fan since I lived in Wrigleyville. For hockey though, I am a huge Red Wings fan and I have season tickets. On the athlete level, I follow Lionel Messi.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

Start doing things that you are passionate about as soon as possible. Do not wait until you graduate! You can learn and gain experience now especially with online access. Do a blog, cut video, etc. There are so many opportunities to actually do something at an early age.

Patrick Lucey - STATS

What are your current primary responsibilities?

As the Director of Data Science at STATS, my role is to build a team of data scientists to help maximize the value of the tracking data that we have. We have SportVU data which has ball and player tracking information in basketball, and soccer data through Prozone.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Basically, the process of using fine-grained data sources such as tracking data to model and analyze specific interactions and contexts. Having pervasive technology to allow domain experts to drill-down to these specific situations should hopefully enable this to occur.

Who do you admire and why?

I recently read Bill Walsh’s book (“The Score Takes Care of Itself”) and I was really amazed by how focused he was on planning and predicting specific patterns of play, and how this gave his teams an advantage. His attention to detail and knowledge of human behavior were so accurate, and obtaining this type of knowledge for a computer is something we are trying to emulate.

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

I follow the Australian cricket and soccer teams religiously. When it comes to an individual athlete, I’m in awe of Peyton Manning. The way that he plans his plays and his ability to predict what is going on is amazing. I also like Zinedine Zidane. The 2006 World Cup game when Brazil played France, was the best individual performance I have ever seen. He was the puppet master – he was so much better than everyone else – it was amazing. I also love Roger Federer – he is an artist with a racquet.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

Do something! So many people ask me how to get into this business, and I always tell them you need a key differentiator, an idea to act on, and something to bring to the table. It isn’t just the idea, but the ability to execute and be able to do something with it.

Chris Mast - Lean Basketball Analytics, LLC

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am CEO and Founder of Lean Basketball; I am responsible for overseeing all the company's operations, including the development and innovation of our Clinch Software, and market expansion whether domestic or overseas teams and more recently diving into media.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Basketball analytics is an area that is being heavily explored, and innovations are being made constantly to collect new types of data. I believe one of the most important aspects is being able to sort through these mountain ranges of data, and picking out the data that’s truly useful-picking out the gems that if applied correctly can lead to success.

Who do you admire and why?

One of the people I really admire is Jackie Robison. When faced with adversity he did not shy away, he did not settle, he consistently maintained his professionalism in the face of prejudice and is an inspiration of hardworking people to not give up.

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

I love the Cleveland Cavaliers, and am not a bandwagon fan given I am from Cleveland, Ohio. It is true that Lebron and I had our differences for a period of four years but that changed a couple years ago with his return to Cleveland.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

I would say do what you can, when you can, while you can. Take advantage of as many opportunities as you can and start now. Research the field you want to go into, and speak with the individuals that have had success in your field. Bottom line: Never stop learning.

Martin Matak - VERT

What are your current primary responsibilities?

As a general overview, I take the company in the direction of wearable technology. From building great relationships to driving innovative technology, I strive to provide the sports industry with the best possible resources to track player movement.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

I don’t see specific aspects of analytics as “fastest growing” but rather as a whole how we are able to make the best measurements. What I really stress to analytics is what I like to call “real” measurements- quantifiable measurements we are able to analyze, such the G force of an actual jump or the exact exertion of energy when a player makes a cut. When we have this ability to get quantitative information, we get performance analytics, which ultimately leads to injury prevention. As we combine different measurements together, we are able to get an actual overview of the condition of the athlete.

Who do you admire and why?

At first, I used to think any “leader” of the sport was the most admirable. Big guys like Michael Jordan. But what I realized most through this company is that some of the best relationships I’ve built is with people I quite frankly didn’t know before but now have had the great pleasure of working with.

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

Growing up in South Florida and being an alumni of University of Florida, I grew to be a Miami Heat fan, by easy default. In terms of international sports, I myself am Croatian, so anytime Croatia plays in the World Cup or some other big international sport, I like to root for them.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

Go experience a job in the sports industry and see if you actually like it. Apply for Internships- you may think you like this specific field or aspect of sports, but sometimes you won’t once you experience it. So like I said, experience it and take advantage of as many opportunities as possible. Build great relationships with those who are also important.

Gary McCoy – WHOOP

Gary McCoy is a 27 year Elite Teams Sports Scientist and Performance Coach. Internationally recognized for injury reduction programs, specific performance enhancement, and biomedical analytics. Winner 2011 PBSCCS Strength Coach of the year, NSCA CSCS RSCC*E, NASM Advisory Board. Previously Director of education for CYBEX, Senior Applied Sports Scientist for Catapult, McCoy works with teams seeking to reduce preventable injury, and formulate athlete readiness programs. In his new role as SVP of Applied Sports Science for the emerging technology "WHOOP", McCoy finds insights into elite basketball health- recovery and performance.

Roderick Moore - Catapult

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I oversee all the college and professional accounts for 13 states from Texas to all over the South East for Catapult. My main role is to go out and develop relationships and educate prospective clients about Catapult and how it can assist them in obtaining their goals

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

The fastest growing trend is understanding the demands of the athlete. Especially, the game data. For the most part, the coaches know what the athlete is doing in practice, but in the game you can lose that sense of what is actually happening with the athletes. The fact that the NCAA is now allowing teams to track in games will help with player safety and improve athletic performance.

Who do you admire and why?

I admire several people. Initially, I wanted to be an orthopedic surgeon. At Morehouse, I met Dr. Gaffney, a psychology professor and I thought he was a great person. So I then thought about pursuing a career in psychology. When I got my Masters at Tennessee, I met Harry Carson who was a sports psychologist. He was the person that made me think that I could do that. I pursued a master in sports psychology and as a grad assistant in sports and conditioning at Tennessee, I was able to combine everything I had studied in the past in the weight room and it really started to mold my career. So, I really admire Harry Carson for opening my eyes up to that world.

Who are your favorite sports teams or athletes that you follow regularly? Why?

My favorite sports teams are clients of Catapult. My favorite athletes are people that I personally trained, coached, and helped get to the next level at Tennessee like T.Y. Hilton.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

Pursue your passion and go with it. For example, if your passion is football get a job in football and not just anything in sports. Don’t just take something because it is in sports, pursue your passion. The most important thing is networking and attending conferences like the BAS. Going to conferences in your area and region allows you to meet people and make them know your interests and career goals. Also intern, volunteer, take a grad assistant role. Do some type of entry-level position to show your work ethic, determination, and ability to succeed under difficult circumstances.

Noel Nash – ESPN

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I oversee the Stats & Information Group at ESPN, which includes all of the clock, scores and statistics across every platform. Our team works closely with studio leaders, producers and ESPN.com writers to help enhance storytelling, digital products, radio and print with advanced statistical insights. We are primarily a service group for those content platforms at ESPN. My goal is to make sure we have the smartest and most creative stories, great content and insights. We believe data is a birthright for every business at ESPN and our job is to turn data into content and insights that enhance the sports experience for fans.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Absolutely the player-tracking technology that is emerging. Capturing player movement with optical and radio-frequency tools are examples of “big data” finally coming to sports. When you’re capturing what players are doing multiple times a second … that is a huge amount of data. What that can mean for scouting purposes, player health and even fan interactions is fascinating. We haven’t even really scratched the surface yet.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

I’m a Miami native and all of my allegiances are in Miami so it all starts with the University of Miami, I’m a lifelong fan. I’m following Mark Richt and hoping for The U to make a return to its rightful place in college football.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sports industry?

There are so many ways to enter the sports industry. Find what you’re passionate about and then find a way to differentiate yourself that will put you over the top. What truly differentiates candidates when I interview them are the soft skills or leadership competencies. Most people that are entering the industry are smart, and I’m sure they can learn the tasks they will be asked to do. What I look for is whether or not this person shows an aptitude for leadership or already has demonstrated leadership.

Dean Oliver – TruMedia Networks

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I oversee the development of Sports Analytics for TruMedia. We have traditionally been invested in baseball and football where we provide statistics and analytical research for teams and media.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

The element of interpreting player tracking data is growing like crazy and there are lots of different ways you can go with it. The trend now is trying to figure out what is actually useful about all that information. I have seen this with different coaches. Given the data you have now, do you know what you should be doing with it?

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire a variety of people but, in particular on the basketball side Dean Smith and George Karl have been a constant source of great conversations for many years. They have been instrumental in my career both giving me an opportunity and great conversations. From a scouting perspective, Herb Livsey has taught me a lot about traditional scouting.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

At the college level, my favorite sports team is Carolina certainly! When it comes to players, I have generally loved defensive players like Tim Duncan. He and Manu Ginobili have always been favorites of mine. However, I do admire Steph Curry. The stuff that he can do, it is hard not to like the guy. Seeing someone with that talent is crazy – it is a talent that I wish I had!

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

In general, make sure you know the sport as well as you possibly can. I’d say more from the coaching perspective, not necessarily the media angle. Getting involved and learning what you can about the coaching side will give you a huge leg up and allow you to understand their language. It not only helps you get in, but also stay in.

Will Pleasants – Wasserman Media Group

What are your current primary responsibilities?

Will Pleasants joined Wasserman Media Group in 2006 and currently serves as Executive Vice President of the Global Consulting division. Working with the divisions' two Co-Presidents, he is responsible for the division's new business, finance, staffing oversight, and overseeing day-to-day operations for the 200+ employees around the globe. He is a 2014 Sports Business Journal "Forty Under 40" Award winner.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Properties using ticketing as Trojan Horse for broader consumer engagement

Who do you admire? Why?

My father because he taught me how to build relationships and trust, treat people consistently and with respect

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

UNC, the Cowboys, and follow golf a decent amount. But honestly, don't watch a lot of sports.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

  • Get exposure to as many facets of the business as possible – brand, property, media, agency, etc.
  • Figure out what you do like and you don't like
  • Demonstrate curiosity and initiative

Liz Rackoff – NBA Charlotte Hornets

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am responsible for the advertising and promotions that support individual ticket sales and packages, online and in-store retail, and our broadcasts.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Marketers must rely on data and analytics to make their decisions. Most of our marketing decisions are based on data revealed by our business intelligence team.

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire my teammates at the Hornets. I am surrounded by people who are so passionate about what they do, they make coming to work each day better than the last. The values of our company are instilled from the top down, and that makes our organization and people amongst the best.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

The Charlotte Hornets, of course. I’m constantly following the team, whether on the road or here. If it’s a road game I’m watching on TV or on our mobile app, or league pass.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Get an internship. This is the biggest thing you can do, it can be difficult because many are unpaid, but it’s an investment of your future. If you go in there and work hard every day your value to the company won’t go unnoticed. Especially with the Hornets, we’ve had many internships open up job opportunities within our organization and in other teams and leagues.

Kerry Ruggieri – Ketchum Sports & Entertainment

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I lead business development and marketing for Ketchum Sports & Entertainment (KSE), one of the strongest-performing specialties within Ketchum. KSE exists to help our clients get more out of their investments in sports & entertainment properties. Having spent the majority of my career leading client sports PR campaigns, I also consult on our largest clients’ programs, with a particular focus in issues & crisis management. Our work ranges from work with all the major leagues to the Olympic Games, FIFA World Cup and beyond.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Analytics and technologies that allow fans to get closer to the players - providing the average fan at home statistics that allow them to compare themselves to the players they love brings a whole new element of respect for those that play the game.

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire anyone with a sense of adventure and work/life balance. Career achievement means nothing if you don’t take time with your friends and family to go live in the world and enjoy it.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

We eat, sleep, breathe Tar Heels at our house. My husband and I both graduated from Carolina and fully believe in the importance of raising our sons to be fans. I’m also a huge Olympic Games fan. There’s something very moving about the entire world’s athletes getting together for two weeks every two years, and I’ll never stop being inspired by that.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

You will be Googled before you are hired.

Matt Sheldon – NFL Chicago Bears

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I collaborate with a talented team of personnel execs, coaches and data/video staff to create competitive advantage. Combining experiences from coaching, analytics and video services over 16 years in NCAA and professional leagues, I offer insight into analysis that increases the probability of winning.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Schematic and tactical scouting. Advances in these areas are craved by coaching, personnel execs, the media and fans.

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire my parents, my wife and so many of the coaches, personnel execs, scouts and operations staff who've all taken time to mentor me in some aspect of sport.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

That's a difficult question because I follow many different sports to serve my large appetite for analytics and sport science—things that create competitive advantage. I'm a huge road cycling fanatic, I follow the UCI pro peloton especially the grand tours (Italy, France, Spain)—I'm a big believer in their recovery protocols. I'm also a hockey fan--U.S. College and NHL—nothing more intense and exciting than a Stanley Cup playoff series—every other night for two months to lift the Cup.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Get involved! There are endless opportunities to learn more about sport, right on your campus—volunteer to work for one of your teams—be a manager, statistician, video assistant or create/update the website. Collect and analyze stats for the school news outlet, or local affiliate(s). Volunteer at any sport event on campus—be a greeter, a member of the chain gang—anything to broaden your perspectives. Once you've exhausted your campus opportunities, draw a 150 mile radius from your front door and seek opportunities. Attend every analytics discussion, coaches convention or special event (conference tourney, NCAA tourney) physically possible. Two feet on the ground is worth countless emails or phone calls.

Rich Sheubrooks – Author/Speaker

What are your current primary responsibilities?

Right now, I am an author and a speaker. In the past I worked for Nike for over 20 years and the NBA for 16 years.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

The most important thing is to understand what to do with all the numbers once you get them. Sometimes with all the data, decisions can swing too far away from the basketball knowledge and what I might call the “eye test.” The toughest thing is to keep the balance between the two, and what to do with the numbers and once you get them.

Who do you admire? Why?

I had the opportunity to work under Jerry West, Michael Jordan, and John Wooden. The ability to pick their brains and learn from them was instrumental in my career. What is so interesting is the each had a different way of doing things. There was not “the way” and that’s the amazing part about life.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

For athletes, I would have to say the international players I helped along the way. I have been called the foremost authority on identifying, selecting, and assisting the global athletes to get to the next level according to David Stern. Some of these players include Tony Parker, Dirk Nowitzki, Manu Ginobili, Bismack Biyombo, and Pau Gasol. I would help their careers start when I headed up both the Nike Hoops Summit and Basketball without Borders, so I think would say they would be the guys I follow. For team, it would have to be the San Antonio Spurs. I really admire the way they run their organization – Gregg Popovich really has a way of connecting with his players. It is just more than X and O and a lot more to do with one-on-one connections, personalities, and building relationships with those players.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

I would say that relationships and networks would really be at the top of the list. I don’t think you can ever have a big enough network or have enough relationships. Those things are just vital – no one lands anywhere by themselves, everyone has had a helping hand along the way. Also there are 3 assists in life – the assist you give someone, the assist you receive, and the assist you give yourself. Those 3 assists along with networking and relationships are key. Lastly, open minds open doors.

Steve Swetoha – NBA Greensboro Swarm

What are your current primary responsibilities?

As president of the Greensboro Swarm, I am responsible for all business operations for the team that includes ticket sales, corporate partnerships, business analytics, marketing, communications, social responsibility, media relations, ticket operations, finance and customer retention/service.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

There are a number of aspects of analytics from specific traits/tendencies, to players shot selection, ranges, etc. Defensive numbers and traits are becoming more imperative.

Who do you admire? Why?

David Stern. David took the NBA to new heights and the guy is/was simply brilliant in where he has taken the league particularly with the television packages.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

Favorite sports team is the Pittsburgh Steelers. I follow a lot of athletes, especially those who are active in their communities.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Internships, networking, building relationships with your professors but more importantly building your resume through internships and experiences.

Frank Wheeler – SAP Sports

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I'm responsible for all business development and sales of SAP Solutions to the sports and entertainment industry in North Amerixa and Latin America.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Basketball operations data scientist positions are on the rise and a huge growth area for all teams - they are looking for a competitive advantage and this is an area that they feel can ultimately help them win more games.

Who do you admire? Why?

Specific to sports, I admire individuals who can use their role in the world of sports or entertainment to help make the world a better place and truly improve people's lives. I admire a lot of folks in this area - Steph Curry, LeBron James, Ernie Els, to name a few.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

Big fan of the game of golf and I really admire Jordan Spieth for what he's been able to accomplish in a short period of time. He's wise beyond his years and I love watching him dissect a course with his caddy. And when he wins he never uses the word "I", and when he loses he always used the word "I". A humble champion.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

A great place to start is in the area of data science, and the ability to manage and understand what to do with data. Besides the traditional sales and marketing jobs, the science aspect of sports - motion sensor technology and the ability to uncover the "so what" about the data is a fast growing area and one that is in high demand, both in business operations and sports operations sides of the sports franchise organization.

Brian Wilder – PrimeSport

Brian Wilder, Senior Vice President with PrimeSport has over 20 years of experience in the sports travel, ticket and hospitality space. Brian has been responsible for creating partnerships within the NASCAR, NFL and collegiate athletics and his current responsibilities include overseeing product development and event activation for all PrimeSport events. Prior to PrimeSport, Brian co-founded Premiere Sports Travel. Wilder helped revolutionize the sports travel industry with partnerships within NASCAR, Collegiate Athletics along with servicing some of the top brands in sports at events such as the Super Bowl, Kentucky Derby and Masters. Brian attended North Carolina State University and currently resides in Cary, NC with his wife and 2 children.

Eric Wortman – Google

What are your current primary responsibilities?

I am the Senior Account Manager at Google focusing on relationship with professional sports leagues. I help them develop and implement campaigns across various advertisement platforms, and come up with strategies for how goals can be met. I help leagues with ticketing and brand campaigns as well. I basically make sure everything is implemented and runs smoothly.

What do you see as the fastest growing or most important aspect of analytics in basketball today?

Analytics in marketing has become very focused on data, specifically data you can get when someone is on your site. You need to really understand your fan’s intent. With all of this data, we can respond with the appropriate marketing message. As they perform other actions across the Internet, it is important that we respond to those signals with the appropriate content/messaging.

Who do you admire? Why?

I admire one of my former professors. He taught me to find the story within data. He inspired me to be an active alumni member and connect with students looking to learn more about digital marketing careers.

Who is your favorite sport team(s) or athlete that you follow regularly? Why?

I am from Ann Arbor, Michigan so I am a fan of the Detroit Pistons, Detroit Tigers, and Michigan college football and basketball. As far as players, I’m a Tom Brady fan (Michigan alum), Reggie Jackson of the Pistons, and Jim Harbaugh although he isn’t an athlete.

What tips do you have for a college student interested in a career in the sport industry?

Teams in the leagues are relatively new to the digital world, so having the analytical background to make coaching recommendations or marketing decisions is very important. Being able to analyze data gives you a big advantage. Teams will be hiring a lot of people with those skill sets in the coming years. If you have both a creative and an analytical mind, you will be much more successful.

Case Competition & Call for Papers

Case Competition

Overview

The BAS 2016 Case Competition will be open to teams of three to four currently enrolled students (e.g. undergrad, graduate, and PhD students). All team members must already have tickets to the 2016 Basketball Analytics Summit to be eligible. There is no additional cost to participate in the case competition.

FAQ

Who is allowed to participate in the case competition?

Any student currently enrolled in a full-time undergraduate or graduate academic program at an accredited university is eligible to participate in the competition. PhD and master’s degree candidates are strongly encouraged to participate.


What is the maximum number of students per team?

Each team may have a maximum of four (4) students, and no less than three (3). There are no restrictions on the academic level of the students comprising a team; that is, teams do not have to be solely composed of either undergraduate or graduate students. Teams may have any mix of the two, or may be composed of solely undergraduate students or graduate students.


What is the cost to enter a team in the case competition?

All participants must purchase tickets to the Summit prior to registering for the case competition. However, it does not cost anything extra to participate in the case competition. The two finalist teams will receive full reimbursement for their Summit registration.


Are there prizes given to the winners?

The winning team will receive $1,000, a basketball signed by the Hornets, and other cool stuff. The other 2nd place team will receive full reimbursement for their Summit registration, other BAS items, and the joy of knowing they gave it their best shot (pun intended).


Does UNC pay for travel expenses for the competitors?

No, all case competition participants are responsible for their own travel expenses and accommodations during the Summit.


What was case competition question last year?

Is the three-point shot undervalued?

The scope of the case is purposefully broad. We want teams to find innovative and unique ways to approach the question. You can expect a similarly broad question again his year.


Where and to whom do I send confused or frustrated emails if I have questions or concerns?

If you encounter any issues or have questions, please contact Omar Henry at Omar_Henry@kenan-flagler.unc.edu or Benjamin Ricks at Benjamin_Ricks@kenan-flagler.unc.edu. The general Kenan Institute Sport website is www.kisport.unc.edu The Director of Sport Entrepreneurship is Dr. Deborah Stroman, dstro@unc.edu or 919.843.0336.

Accomodations

Logistics

The McColl Building, home of UNC's Kenan-Flagler Business School, and Kenan Center, home of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, are located adjacent to one another. Visitor parking is conveniently located behind the McColl Building in the UNC Kenan-Flagler Parking Deck. Koury Auditorium is part of the McColl Building.

Driving Directions:

Parking

Visitors to Koury Auditorium, McColl Building, and the Kenan Center (Home of the Basketball Analytics Summit) may park in the Business School parking deck starting on Friday after 1:00 p.m. and all day on Saturday. This parking deck is located on Kenan Drive and located directly across from the McColl building.

Please do not park in spaces marked "Reserved at All Times" to avoid having your car ticketed and/or towed. If you have questions, please call the Kenan Center at (919) 962-0228.

We encourage conference attendees to carpool, bike, or take public transit. Bike parking is available in the parking deck or behind the McColl building. There are several bus lines which run close to the business school – plan your trip at: www.gotriangle.org

Hotels